yesicare

Archive for the ‘Development’ Category

Why Egypt Matters

In Development, Elections, Global Issues, Human Rights on February 4, 2011 at 12:51 am

Egypt has been dominating news headlines recently–mass protests, journalists detained, all that jazz. While I haven’t been able to watch too much of Al Jazeera’s live coverage of this event, I did find myself asking “Why Egypt, and why now?” so here’s a little bit of research to try to answer that question.

To understand Egypt, it’s important to understand the history and political background of the country. Officially the Arab Republic of Egypt, the country is located in north-east Africa. Egypt has historically been vital to commerce between Europe, Africa and Asia, due to its proximity to the Suez canal and transcontinental trade routes. Napoleon’s invasion of Egypt in 1798 rekindled Europe’s interest in Egypt, and by the 1850s, Alexandria and the gulf of the Suez region were connected via railroad. Fearing international and French influence as well as the vulnerability in the Suez, the British opposed the construction of the Suez Canal from construction to opening in 1869, but ironically enough, profited most from its opening, since it made the Indian Ocean and the Far East much more accessible than railroad. With the economic boost of the Suez trade, Britain quickly bought shares in the Suez Canal Company, becoming a major shareholder in Egyptian politics and government along with France. With the signing of the Entente Cordiale in 1904, Britain secured its control over Egypt, while France was given free reign over Algeria, Tunisia and Morocco.

Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements

Endangered cultures

In Anthropology, Development, Global Issues on January 12, 2011 at 4:03 am

Philip Borges on endangered cultures. Of the 6,000 languages in the world, our next generation does not speak 3,000 of them. Shocking.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

Why Sudan’s referendum matters

In Development, Genocide, Global Issues, Religion on January 11, 2011 at 10:17 pm

Sudan's potential split is an ethnic, political, social and tribal issue.

There’s a lot of talk going on about Sudan’s upcoming referendum that will determine if the South becomes its independent state. But I didn’t really understand why it is being referred to as “historic”. And since my alma mater, Annandale High School, is having a STAND benefit concert on Friday, I think I owe it to myself to understand this country and its current situation better.

Read the rest of this entry »

1st World Trash, 3rd World Victims

In Development, Environment, Global Issues on December 29, 2010 at 3:44 am

How does American waste end up in a toxic dump in Nairobi, Kenya?

With another decade coming to an end, I decided to finally sell my first laptop by the end of this month. While trying to figure out how best to get rid of it, I came across this somewhat-horrifying picture of this toxic garbage dump in Nairobi, Kenya. This led me to wonder, “Exactly HOW would my laptop, of all things, end up thousands of miles away in a dump like this one?” A little bit of research yielded the true story behind how far our trash actually travels. Read the rest of this entry »

What Wikileaks reveals about Abuse of Power and Bacha Bazi

In Development, Human Rights on December 22, 2010 at 9:51 pm

While browsing around Tumblr, I came across a story that caught me by surprise: a headline that said “Texas Company Helped Pimp Little Boys To Stoned Afghan Cops”. My first reaction was “Surley not!”, but with further research, I came across more and more details that had surfaced through Wikileaks cables about a shocking issue with DynCorp’s involvement in Afghanistan.

Mr. Atmar, Wikileaks reveals, encouraged hushing of DynCorp's atrocities in Afghanistan.

A little background on the situation first. DynCorp, a defense company based in DC, is currently contracted by the US government to train soldiers in Afghanistan. In June 24, 2009’s cable between Afghan Interior Minister Hanif Atmar and US assistant ambassador Joseph Mussomeli, a party, PARTIALLY thrown by DynCorp, is discussed. Some extracts from the cable:

On the Kunduz Regional Training Center (RTC) DynCorp event of April 11 (reftel), Atmar reiterated his insistence that the U.S. try to quash any news article on the incident or circulation of a video connected with it. He continued to predict that publicity would “endanger lives.” He disclosed that he has arrested two Afghan police and nine other Afghans as part of an MoI investigation into Afghans who facilitated this crime of “purchasing a service from a child.”

Atmar said he insisted the journalist be told that publication would endanger lives. His request was that the U.S. quash the article and release of the video. Amb Mussomeli responded that going to the journalist would give her the sense that there is a more terrible story to report. Atmar then disclosed the arrest of two Afghan National Police (ANP) and nine other Afghans (including RTC language assistants) as part of an MoI investigation into Afghan “facilitators” of the event. The crime he was pursuing was “purchasing a service from a child,” which in Afghanistan is illegal under both Sharia law and the civil code, and against the ANP Code of Conduct for police officers who might be involved. Read the rest of this entry »

What’s the cost of natural disaster?

In Development, Environment on December 16, 2010 at 5:33 am

Over 260,000 people died in 2010 due to natural disasters, and according to recent analyses, this has cost us all about $222 billion dollars. Most of the devastation occurred in Pakistan and Haiti, and were caused by climate-change related factors.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

 

Living Without Lights

In Development, Global Issues on December 15, 2010 at 12:05 am

73% of Northern Ghana lives without electricity, and without light. Can you imagine an evening without light?

Vodpod videos no longer available.